How to Build a Contact Form that Converts

How to Build a Contact Form that Converts

Having a contact form on your website is a great way to have interaction between your brand and visitors. When building a contact form, the key thing is to make it simple yet capturing only the information that your company needs. Don’t make it challenging for someone who wants to contact your company. The whole idea of a contact form is to lead to starting a conversation.

Here are a few tips to help you build a contact form for your website that also converts:

Minimize the number of fields on your form

Tips for Creating Forms that Convert | BlueprintThe fewer fields your contact form has, the more conversion you’ll get. Most people find contact forms with over 6 fields intimidating which causes a resistance that causes your visitor to not fill out your contact form. Eliminating unnecessary fields will help the conversion rate of your contact form significantly. Try to stick with around 3 to 6 fields. If you have an application, try to break the form up into different sections or steps.

Cut down the amount of required fields needed. Not everyone wants to share information such as their phone number. Instead, if you want to ask someone for their phone number, the best way to do so is by making that field optional and not required. Doing this will help by not forcing someone into giving out information they don’t want to give out.

Catchy call-to-action headline

Encouraging your visitors to complete your form is easier with a catchy headline. Some sample headlines are:

  • Get your free eBook
  • Claim your eBook now
  • Sign up for your eBook today

To submit or not to submit

Your submit button is more than just a button but the final opportunity to convince your visitors that they should fill out your contact form. You should customize your button based on whatever your offer is. What we mean by that is make your text specific.

Some examples include:

  • Download your eBook
  • Get your free eBook
  • Join our Newsletter
  • Click here to download your eBook

These examples are much more alluring than “submit” or “send”.

Make your button stand out! Using capitalization, when necessary. This would depend on the look and feel of your website. Use a contrasting color that ties in to your color palette and add a hover color. Hover colors will indicate that the button is clickable to your visitors.

Design and layout of your form

The way your form is designed and laid out is great for optimization. Use colors that stand out and contrast with the background. You want your visitors to notice your contact form. Keep in mind the best place for your contact form, whether it is on the left or right side of your website. Place your contact form above the fold. That means if your contact from is on the contact page than you want it to be positioned in the upper half of your website so it is visible without having to scroll down the page.

Creating a simple, creative and functional contact form will motivate your visitors to reach out and contact your company. Partnering with the right web design company is paramount to helping you find the best way to encourage consumers to part with their valuable information and pass it on to you.

By: LaToya Smith
  • Elizabeth Weaver

    Great tips on design and layout. Too often, people forget that the entire point of utilizing a form is to create an opportunity for a conversion in some capacity and therefore forget to make it eye-catching and user-friendly!

  • Jeff Cline

    I LOVE THIS POST.

    Latoya, thanks for hitting on a topic that unfortunately often goes unnoticed, and in such a shameful way.

    Headlines and submit buttons – you hit the mark here. Why do I want to give my personal information so you can bomb me with emails? You are best to explain the value that you are providing (and make it worthwhile) before asking.

    I’d add to the list above with “Top 5 things you need to know” (Or didn’t think of). What is the real value that you are providing? a newsletter? – Think about the valuable knowledge and benefits the newsletter provides and change that headline from “sign up for our newsletter” to “Cost Saving Advice from _x_ industry experts, delivered to your inbox monthly!”

    The Best forms, yes, are usually limited, often to one field. I would argue the case where on a few rare occasions, a lengthy multiple choice form can both pre-qualify a lead, as well as speed up the sales process by asking the fundamental questions that you need to know EVERY time. The caveat to this is only asking the necessary questions, and knowing that this may not be the best option for every industry.

    Experiment, A/B split testing will prove out which variation converts the best. Most of all, be exited of the value of what you are offering!